Skip to content. Accessibility info.

Bike Lane Projects

Almon Street


Planning is underway to add bike lanes on Almon Street to enhance safety and to continue the implementation of a network of bicycle lanes in the municipality.

Status

The municipality is collecting surveys from the public to further understand the preferences for this project.You have until May 18, 2017 to fill out the survey on Shape Your City.

The detailed project presentation that was reviewed at the May 3 public engagement session is now available for review.

A report will be submitted to Regional Council in early summer 2017 to seek approval for the recommended option and the lanes and markings would be added during a street resurfacing project taking place in summer 2017. 

Overview

The width of Almon Street changes and can be divided into three segments.The type of bicycle facility being considered depends on the segment. The following are the current and proposed options:

Segment of Almon Street Current Proposed

Gottingen Street to Agricola Street

Two travel lanes and one side of on-street parking Two travel lanes that have “share the lane” bicycle markings and one side of on-street parking. No separate bicycle lane.
Agricola Street to Dublin Street Two travel lanes and two sides of on-street parking Two travel lanes, two bicycle lanes, and one side of on-street parking
Dublin Street to Connolly Street Two travel lanes and two sides of on-street parking Two travel lanes, two bicycle lanes, and no on-street parking
Connolly Street to Connaught Avenue Two travel lanes and two sides of on-street parking Two travel lanes that have “share the lane” bicycle markings, no on-street parking. No separate bicycle lane.


South Park Street Bike Lane Improvements


To improve safety and bicycle route continuity, the municipality is designing changes to the existing bike lanes on South Park Street (from Sackville Street to Morris Street/University Avenue) and an extension of these bike lanes south to Inglis Street.

Status

A public engagement session was held on Jan. 31, 2017, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Halifax Central Library (Lindsay Children's Room). For those that were unable to attend the session, the presentation and information boards, are available on Shape Your City.

Feedback gathered at a Public Open House held in April 2016 has informed the development of three options for South Park Street. Options being considered include:

Option 1: Enhanced Painted Bike Lanes

  • Install a painted buffer between parked vehicles and the bike lanes to help prevent “dooring”
  • Continue the bike lanes south to Inglis Street from where they currently end at University/Morris
  • Extend the bike lanes up to the intersections and introduce a new type of intersection crossing pavement marking
  • Change or remove some of the turning lanes for motor vehicles at the intersections
  • Use a more durable type of paint for all pavement markings

Option 2: Protected Bike Lanes

  • Add a barrier between the bike lanes and the vehicle lanes by:
    • On one side, move the bike lane to the curb side of the parking lane to provide cyclists a greater level of protection from motor vehicles; and,
    • On the other side, remove on-street parking and add some type of physical separation (e.g., bollards, curb, planter boxes, etc.) between the bike lane and the vehicle lane
  • Continue the protected bike lanes south to Inglis Street
  • Extend the bike lanes up to the intersections and introduce a new type of intersection crossing pavement marking
  • Modify bus stops to prevent buses from having to stop in the bike lanes
  • Change or remove some of the turning lanes for motor vehicles at the intersections
  • Use a more durable type of paint for all pavement markings

Option 2a: Protected Bike Lanes with Off-Street Variation

  • Move the south-bound bike lane off street to the space between the curb and sidewalk from Sackville Street to Spring Garden Road and/or from Spring Garden Road to University Avenue (subject to additional consultation and analysis)
  • Other potential changes are the same as the Protected Bike Lane (option two above)

Potential Changes to the Street

Potential changes to other street uses resulting from the bike lane extension and improvements include:

Option 1: Enhanced Painted Bike Lanes

  • South Street to Inglis Street: removal of 30 on-street parking spaces from one side of the street
  • Sackville to Morris/University Avenue: removal of 7 on-street parking spaces
  • Morris Street/University Avenue to South Street: removal of 3 on-street parking spaces
  • Relocation of 1 taxi stand (5 spaces)

Option 2: Protected Bike Lanes

  • Sackville Street to University Avenue: removal of 25 on-street parking spaces
  • University Avenue to South Street: no net change in number of on-street parking spaces
  • South Street to Inglis Street: removal of 30 on-street parking spaces
  • Relocation of 1 taxi stand (5 spaces)
  • Relocation/reconfiguration of 4 accessible parking spaces

Option 2a: Protected Bike Lanes with Off-Street Variation

  • Sackville Street to Spring Garden Road: removal of 3 on-street parking spaces
  • Spring Garden Road to University Avenue: removal of 5 on-street parking spaces
  • University Avenue to South Street: no net change in number of on-street parking spaces
  • South Street to Inglis Street: removal of 30 on-street parking spaces
  • Relocation/reconfiguration of 4 accessible parking spaces
  • Changes to sidewalk width may be necessary
  • Detailed analysis of potential impact to trees would be necessary

Other potential changes common to all options include:

  • Removal of turn lanes at the Spring Garden Road and Morris/University Avenue intersections
  • Some changes to on-street parking regulations on side streets in the blocks south of South Street would be considered to facilitate improved availability of parking for residents, visitors and customers

This project is in the functional design stage. The extension and improvements will have to be approved by Regional Council. Staff’s goal is to proceed with detailed design and a recommendation to Council in 2017 to implement the preferred option in 2018 (pending budget approval and co-ordination with street repaving and adjacent projects under construction).

View the frequently asked questions about the South Park Street Bike Lane project.

If you have questions or comments on this project, please contact Mark Nener at nenerm@halifax.ca

Devonshire Avenue


Proposed Walking and Bicycling Improvements (including a portion of Duffus Street from Novalea to Isleville)

The Halifax Active Transportation Priorities Plan identifies proposed bicycle lanes on Devonshire Avenue and also recommends improving the “walkability” of our street network. In conjunction with a planned resurfacing project for 2016, a number of improvements for walking and bicycling are also being planned for this corridor.

An Open House for this project was held on Thursday, December 3, 2015. Here is a response from municipal staff to questions and comments raised in conjunction with the open house.

Status

Preliminary design of this project is now complete. Before it can be implemented, Regional Council will be asked to approve the changes to vehicle and parking lanes that make the bicycle lane possible. A report will be considered by Council in late winter 2016. The project is also dependant on approval of the 2016/2017 Capital Budget (expected by March 2016). If everything is approved, the project will proceed to final design and work would be planned for the 2016 construction season.

Overview

Here is a link to the preliminary concept plan for the project:

Existing Road Cross Section

Existing Road Cross Section

Proposed Road Cross Section

Proposed Road Cross Section

 

The proposed bicycle and pedestrian improvements include:Corners bumped out plus ramps for pedestrians

  • The addition of "corner bump-outs" at a number of intersections. These are extensions of the curb that make street crossings shorter and safer for people on foot.
  • New pedestrian ramps to cross Devonshire Avenue at Barrington Street.These make sidewalks accessible to wheelchairs, scooters and strollers.
  • Bicycle lanes from Isleville to Barrington, plus a short bike link to Niobe Gate on city property west of the sidewalk between Devonshire and Niobe Gate (in front of 2872 & 2878 Barrington Street). Bike Lanes increase separation between people on bicycle and people in cars.

 

Here is how the arrangement of bump out, pesestrian ramp, and bicycle lane might look:

Photo by Dan Burden - bump out, pedestrian ramp and bike lane.

Photo by Dan Burden - bump out, pedestrian ramp and bike lane.

Potential Changes to the Street

Here are some of the effects of these improvements:

  • The number of lanes on Devonshire will be permanently reduced from four to two (there are currently two lanes during all but teh peak hours).
  • No significant changes to the location of on-street parking on Devonshire Avenue
  • On Duffus Street, on street parking between Novalea and Isleville will be removed from the south side of the street.
  • There will be no left turns allowed from Devonshire onto Barrington Street (our traffic analsis shows that no one attempts this turn currently).


Frequently Asked Questions

Where are the “bump-outs” proposed?
They are proposed at:

  • The crosswalk at Young Street;
  • Vincent Street;
  • The crosswalk at Richmond St. and in front of #3278 & 3290 Devonshire;
  • Both sides of Albert Street;
  • The crosswalk between #3405 (daycare) and #3380 (Court) Devonshire.
  • Roome Street

If the bump out makes my driveway longer, or adds extra grass between the curb and the sidewalk, who maintains that?
The Halifax Regional Municipality Streets By-law S-300 Section 11, states: “Maintenance of Grass: Abutters, except where grass cutting and maintenance service is provided by the Municipality, shall maintain any grass between the sidewalk and the curb closely clipped and to a height not greater than six inches and shall keep such areas in good order including raking and renewal of the grass as necessary.”

Won’t reducing the number of lanes from four to two make traffic worse?
No. Devonshire only carries about 3,500 vehicles per day. Windsor Street by comparison carries about 11,500 vehicles per day on two lanes. Traffic is not forecast to grow in this area enough to warrant maintaining the current four lane roadway.

Why aren’t the bicycle lanes “protected” between the parking and the curb?
This configuration would require more space than we have between the curb and the median. Since this street is not very busy, parking is only used sporadically, and the bicycle lanes will be a little wider than usual, regular bicycle lanes between the travel lane and the parking lane should be enough to improve the level of comfort.

What is involved in the repaving project?

Removing 50mm from the existing surface, and reapplying a layer of asphalt.

What will this bicycle lane connect to?

A connected network of bicycle routes is one of the three main goals of the Halifax Active Transportation Priorities Plan. We are working to achieve that goal one piece at a time. The plan sees Devonshire as a connector from a proposed local street bike route on Isleville Street to an envisioned extension of the Barrington Greenway Trail from North Street to Niobe Gate. Until we can establish the feasibility of the greenway extension, the Devonshire bicycle lane will still make a useful connection from north end neighbourhoods to a major employment hub on the waterfront (Irving Shipyard & CFB Stadacona), with a combined workforce with 1000s of employees.

Devonshire is on a hill – doesn’t this limit its usefulness as a bike route?
If you need to get up the hill, Devonshire is least steep of any east-west street in the area. It even has a nice plateau between Hanover and Albert to rest your legs!

Comments /Questions? Please forward any questions or comments to David MacIsaac, Active Transportation Program Supervisor at macisad@halifax.ca